Key Environmental Issues

Showing comments 1 to 21 of 21

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 18

Received: 10/10/2017

Respondent: Mr Michael Morley

Representation:

Mid Suffolk has some of the finest and most productive agricultural land in the country and it is vital that housing development should only be approved on lower grade land.

Full text:

Mid Suffolk has some of the finest and most productive agricultural land in the country and it is vital that housing development should only be approved on lower grade land.

Object

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 734

Received: 03/11/2017

Respondent: Mr. Nick Miller for Sudbury Green Belt Group

Representation:

Environmental Assets and Biodiversity: We do not doubt that many such areas of priority habitat etc have been recorded, though not all have a system of protection is in place. Lack of a green strategy on the part of the bodies consulted, means that important urban fringe sites are overlooked. Our contention is that given the new future development scenarios, all areas facing extensive development need an independent appraisal.

Full text:

Environmental Assets and Biodiversity: We do not doubt that many such areas of priority habitat etc have been recorded, though not all have a system of protection is in place (Sudbury airfield County Wildlife Site: a lack of mixed farming, autumn stubbles and suitable winter crops (eg game cover, seeded barley, etc), and removal by farmer of perch posts, has led to a dramatic decline in Corn Bunting numbers since 2011 - 8 pairs down to just 3; of which the County Council ecologist was unaware). But we regard this as far too complacent: the document only refers to sites which are 'the tip of the iceberg' ie scheduled sites far from where people live, and the lack of a green strategy on the part of the bodies consulted, means that a) sites where development is intended which have priority habitats and species that have gone unrecorded (Churchfield Rd Sudbury, approx. 20 acres); b) such few surveys as are carried out, come late in the planning process; c) Ecologist reports have been known to overlook priority habitat etc (Churchfield Road Sudbury, 2 Priority Grassland Habitats identified by Natural England EIA assessment, Adonis Ecology had dismissed the grassland as of no value. Our contention is that given the new future development scenarios, all areas facing extensive development need an independent appraisal (so that sites like Churchfield Road, with its exceptional view of Chilton Church across a flower-rich field rich in scarce flowers and butterfly species), don't continue to be disregarded.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 1086

Received: 04/11/2017

Respondent: Mr Graham Shorrock

Representation:

Much of the environmental attractiveness of the districts is not only attributable to the landscape but also to the many hamlets and villages that are within the area. In considering housing development it is vital that theses are not compromised by developments that merge villages together without maintaining adequate green spaces between the towns and villages.

Full text:

Much of the environmental attractiveness of the districts is not only attributable to the landscape but also to the many hamlets and villages that are within the area. In considering housing development it is vital that theses are not compromised by developments that merge villages together without maintaining adequate green spaces between the towns and villages.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 1563

Received: 26/10/2017

Respondent: Ms Carole Skippen

Representation:

it is very important to remember that climate change will affect all of us, more importantly the Strand and along the peninsular and along the Wherstead Road are already affected by flooding especially at very high tides. To build on, or near, areas which are all ready affected by flooding does not make any sense. To build on Land between Bourne Hill and the A137 will cause increased risk of flooding and also with surface water and sewerage.

Full text:

it is very important to remember that climate change will affect all of us, more importantly the Strand and along the peninsular and along the Wherstead Road are already affected by flooding especially at very high tides. To build on, or near, areas which are all ready affected by flooding does not make any sense. To build on Land between Bourne Hill and the A137 will cause increased risk of flooding and also with surface water and sewerage.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 2820

Received: 04/11/2017

Respondent: Mr Andrew Coxhead

Representation:

Development of land must take into account Environmental Impact.

Full text:

Development of land must take into account Environmental Impact.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 2924

Received: 04/11/2017

Respondent: Mr Peter Sutters

Representation:

Air quality along the A12/A14 corridors can be poor at times - it is most desirable to maintain a quasi Green Belt/ Green Lung around the A12/A14 corridors o protect settlements from pollution.

Full text:

Air quality along the A12/A14 corridors can be poor at times - it is most desirable to maintain a quasi Green Belt/ Green Lung around the A12/A14 corridors o protect settlements from pollution.

Object

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 3279

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: RSPB Stour Estuary and Wolves Wood

Representation:

The RSPB considers it is essential that the Council undertakes an exercise to map the network of designated sites, priority habitats and species across the District and that this map is presented as part of the evidence base for the Local Plan in preparation.

We commend Ipswich Borough Council's "Ipswich Wildlife Network" (https://www.ipswich.gov.uk/sites/default/files/ipswich_wildlife_network.pdf) and in accordance with the Duty to Co-operate, would urge Babergh to undertake a similar exercise. This would accord with paragraph 117 of the National Planning Policy Framework which says that local planning authorites should plan for biodiversity at a landscape-scale across local authority boundaries.

Full text:

The RSPB considers it is essential that the Council undertakes an exercise to map the network of designated sites, priority habitats and species across the District and that this map is presented as part of the evidence base for the Local Plan in preparation.

We commend Ipswich Borough Council's "Ipswich Wildlife Network" (https://www.ipswich.gov.uk/sites/default/files/ipswich_wildlife_network.pdf) and in accordance with the Duty to Co-operate, would urge Babergh to undertake a similar exercise. This would accord with paragraph 117 of the National Planning Policy Framework which says that local planning authorites should plan for biodiversity at a landscape-scale across local authority boundaries.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 3315

Received: 09/11/2017

Respondent: mr k j white

Representation:

The drive for housing at all costs (presumed consent) is certain to have a negative impact on the protection of our rural environment, viz heritage assets; landscapes; and biodiversity in wildlife and flora. Being involved in conservation, heritage and the natural environment in both my private and professional life, with few exceptions I see little to praise in the current protection given to these areas all of which enhance the quality of our lives. Any further erosion in the planning processes will irreversibly damage the rural environment and the heritage treasures it holds for posterity.

Full text:

With existing concerns in the matters of heritage and the natural environment, this undeniable drive for new housing seemingly at all costs (presumed consent) is certain to weaken the protection given to our heritage buildings and to our natural environment. Being involved in these aspects of conservation in both my private and professional life, it is on these matters I feel qualified to make representation.

1. As a property covenant surveyor for a large national charity I am involved with the protection, from inappropriate development, of covenanted landscapes and period properties across Suffolk. Usually these are heritage properties and /or landscapes within designated conservation zones and as such the processes of planning/listed building consents, which more or less share a common purpose, are involved. In consequence I see good and bad outcomes, the latter often occurring where the setting of the property has been ignored or overlooked. The National Trust, as do Historic England, give as high regard to the setting of a heritage building just as they do to its historic fabric or architectural features. The setting is often an integral part of the listed building's character and causing harm by inappropriate development irreversibly lessens its overall historic value. Unfortunately, in certain authorities, how a development proposal might affect the setting of a heritage building e.g. its group value when set among others; or the street scene; or the local landscape; or its green surroundings, are often ignored or given little consideration. Unlike Babergh, Mid Suffolk does not have the numerous designated conservation areas and their legal protections provided, which probably weakens their resolve to give its many unique heritage properties the protection they deserve. I would hope, therefore, the merger between the two authorities will be a positive move and give similar protections to Mid Suffolk's heritage assets as Babergh has to date provided within its own jurisdictions.
2. Outside designated conservation areas our local authorities show a marked reluctance to care for its mature trees where known to be at risk, invariably resisting any TPO protection just by deciding what has or has not amenity value - giving little if any consideration to the much wider benefits that trees bring to our lives. Trees and green spaces enhance the quality of peoples' lives in many ways, bringing both tangible and intangible benefits. They reabsorb and release moisture back into the atmosphere - important in flood risk areas; they absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere - beneficial to the stability of climatic conditions; they provide therapeutic benefits and aid to mental health and the feeling of well being; they provide forage and shelter for wildlife to survive. In my experience such benefits are rarely if ever considered.
3. Another area of concern that I see in my covenant work is the creeping urbanisation of our villages. My own village of Drinkstone has always been proud of its rural nature, its trees, its hedgerows; its many footpaths and its dark skies. The joys of nature can be seen & heard all around. Unfettered development could so easily destroy its present very rural character. Already one new housing development with its ornamental trees, fences, neat greensward, paving and hard kerb lines, has in essence brought a piece of suburbia into the village. Similar developments may tip the balance towards an inevitable fragmentation of the village's rural environment. And with such development comes the significant increase in vehicular traffic and associated noise and atmospheric pollution that multi vehicle households inevitably bring.

As I see it, unsustainable development as proposed by the new local plan will further undermine all these areas of concern, and pose a real risk to the quality of life that many like me hoped for when I chose village life as a means to find a slower, more peaceful, closer to nature and harmonious way of living.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 3323

Received: 06/11/2017

Respondent: Janet Weavers

Representation:

The environment (green spaces, recreational areas, wildlife habitat etc) must be protected and enhanced. If people are to be encouraged to be more healthy then easily accessible open areas must be provided - it's counter-productive to make people use their cars to access recreation/wildlife areas. The general landscape must also be protected so that we do not lose the distinctiveness of our Suffolk countryside. Sprawl is not good. "Dumping" is not good - we had that in the 70s. Once gone, our special tourist-attracting landscape is gone forever.

Full text:

The environment (green spaces, recreational areas, wildlife habitat etc) must be protected and enhanced. If people are to be encouraged to be more healthy then easily accessible open areas must be provided - it's counter-productive to make people use their cars to access recreation/wildlife areas. The general landscape must also be protected so that we do not lose the distinctiveness of our Suffolk countryside. Sprawl is not good. "Dumping" is not good - we had that in the 70s. Once gone, our special tourist-attracting landscape is gone forever.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 4155

Received: 07/11/2017

Respondent: Mr Andy Day

Representation:

Surely what attracts people to this area is its natural beauty ,the farmland the rivers ,wildlife to lose this to a huge housing development would be unthinkable and have a huge impact on the environment , I have lived in Sproughton for 10 years and have seen Barn owls , foxes, deer Buzzards kestrels numerous smaller birds to lose their habitat would be criminal , I understand the need for housing but surely more suitable brown field sites could be used rather than the wonderful Chantry vale and surrounding areas

Full text:

Surely what attracts people to this area is its natural beauty ,the farmland the rivers ,wildlife to lose this to a huge housing development would be unthinkable and have a huge impact on the environment , I have lived in Sproughton for 10 years and have seen Barn owls , foxes, deer Buzzards kestrels numerous smaller birds to lose their habitat would be criminal , I understand the need for housing but surely more suitable brown field sites could be used rather than the wonderful Chantry vale and surrounding areas

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 5510

Received: 08/11/2017

Respondent: Mr Colin Johnston

Representation:

Babergh contains a large number of SLAs (not mentioned) which point up the natural diversity and beauty of the rural areas. Conservation areas were considered for many more villages and these should be brought forward for action: such areas containing both the best of the built up and natural assets would help focus communities on what is important to them while, at the same time, giving the tourist industry a boost, by presenting Suffolk at its best.

Full text:

Babergh contains a large number of SLAs (not mentioned) which point up the natural diversity and beauty of the rural areas. Conservation areas were considered for many more villages and these should be brought forward for action: such areas containing both the best of the built up and natural assets would help focus communities on what is important to them while, at the same time, giving the tourist industry a boost, by presenting Suffolk at its best.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 5880

Received: 09/11/2017

Respondent: Stowmarket Society

Representation:

You have omitted to give the number of Conservation Areas in Mid Suffolk.

Full text:

You have omitted to give the number of Conservation Areas in Mid Suffolk.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 6230

Received: 09/11/2017

Respondent: MSDC Green Group

Representation:

Please see revised text in our submission

Full text:

Please see revised text in our submission

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 6656

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Mr Peter Powell

Representation:

BDC already have adequate environmental policies, but the planning department dosn't apply them robustly.
BDC also have the duty devolved from Natural England to ensure Biodiversity issues are enforced, they have failed to do that robustly.
SLA's are under consideration but are perfectly applicable, if applied robustly.
But in the case of Wolsey Grange they apparently were turned inside out so the inside of the development looked nice but its perimeter was ringed by three story flats which will present like alcatraz on the hill top of Chantry Vale. This is not robust application of policy.

Full text:

BDC already have adequate environmental policies, but the planning department dosn't apply them robustly.
BDC also have the duty devolved from Natural England to ensure Biodiversity issues are enforced, they have failed to do that robustly.
SLA's are under consideration but are perfectly applicable, if applied robustly.
But in the case of Wolsey Grange they apparently were turned inside out so the inside of the development looked nice but its perimeter was ringed by three story flats which will present like alcatraz on the hill top of Chantry Vale. This is not robust application of policy.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 7824

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Mrs Sarah Knibbs

Representation:

A coherent 20 year plan will ensure that the environment is protected - maintaining what we have and planning for improvement where required.
The impacts of climate change will affect our coastline and flood plains. Any construction within or adjacent to these areas should be avoided.
The road systems require significant work if they are to manage increased traffic movements and help to improve air quality.

Full text:

A coherent 20 year plan will ensure that the environment is protected - maintaining what we have and planning for improvement where required.
The impacts of climate change will affect our coastline and flood plains. Any construction within or adjacent to these areas should be avoided.
The road systems require significant work if they are to manage increased traffic movements and help to improve air quality.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 8551

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: RSPB Stour Estuary and Wolves Wood

Representation:

We welcome the Councils' commitment to the strategic mitigation plan currently under development for recreational impacts of new housing developments on internationally-designated sites, known as the Recreational Avoidance and Mitigation Strategy (RAMS).

Alongside the RAMS, we consider that the key means to avoid increasing pressure on designated sites will be through provision of high quality green space close to people's homes and at a scale that is appropriate to the level of planned growth. This should be wildlife rich green space, again in line with the Council's biodiversity duties.

Full text:

We recommend that it is specified in the pre-submission Local Plan that the frameworks and masterplans for each development must include clear and evidenced strategies to avoid increasing recreational pressure on internationally designated wildlife sites, in line with duties on the Council to conserve biodiversity.

We welcome the Councils' commitment to the strategic mitigation plan currently under development for recreational impacts of new housing developments on internationally-designated sites, known as the Recreational Avoidance and Mitigation Strategy (RAMS). Where a development is likely to give rise to a significant effect on an internationally designated site and it is possible to mitigate this effect, developers should be required to contribute to the RAMS, to ensure that mitigation is strategic rather than piecemeal, and give confidence that mitigation measures can be delivered. We recommend that these requirements are specified within an appropriate policy in the Local Plan.

Alongside the RAMS, we consider that the key means to avoid increasing pressure on designated sites will be through provision of high quality green space close to people's homes and at a scale that is appropriate to the level of planned growth. This should be wildlife rich green space, again in line with the Council's biodiversity duties.

All developments should be nature friendly, with homes for nature integrated with homes for people during the design phase. Providing access to high quality greenspace on people's doorsteps will help to alleviate recreational pressure on important wildlife sites from the new developments and promote and connection to nature for residents.

With the planned scale of development there will be many opportunities to bring nature closer to people at the local scale. An example of how to develop nature-friendly homes is the Kingsbrook Barratt Homes development at Aylesbury, Oxfordshire where RSPB has worked in partnership with Barratt Homes PLC to design housing that benefits people and nature (https://ww2.rspb.org.uk/our-work/conservation/projects/kingsbrook-housing).

Further details on our experience working with Barratt Homes PLC and Aylesbury Vale District Council to set a positive example of nature-friendly and wildlife rich development, which we would like to see as the new common standard is provided in Annex 1.

Offering the opportunity for increased connection to nature within the development, through accessible and wildlife-rich green space and wildlife friendly gardens benefits both the natural environment and maximises the health and well-being benefits for residents. The benefits of nature on people's mental health are widely reported within scientific literature; however, recently it has become apparent that the quality of the natural environment may be more important than the quantity of it. People are twice as likely to report low psychological distress when living close to quality green space compared with those living near low quality green space . Therefore, it is important not only to plan for easy access to green spaces in our living environment but also to improve the quality of these green spaces - incorporating greater levels of biodiversity in our green spaces could be one way to achieve this.

Natural England have established methods to calculate how much green space will be required in relation to the level of recreational need, known as the Accessible Natural Greenspace Standard (http://publications.naturalengland.org.uk/category/47004). We recommend these methods provide the basis of calculating necessary greenspace for new developments. The RSPB would be grateful for the opportunity to provide further advice on these matters during preparation of the pre-submission version of the Local Plan.

Object

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 9018

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Mrs Lynda Shephard

Representation:

Undesirable and irresponsible to build industrial units off A134 in Long Melford. Would lose beautiful agricultural land which residents in Harefield and villagers currently enjoy and appreciate. This offers a marvellous habitat for many species of birds. In our garden alone we have counted 24, 10 of which are unusual. They all nest here as well. Seems totally inappropriate to consider building industrial units here which will be noisy with transport coming and going, bright security lights and ruining the spectacular country views we currently enjoy. Plenty of unoccupied business units already nearby

Full text:

Undesirable and irresponsible to build industrial units off A134 in Long Melford. Would lose beautiful agricultural land which residents in Harefield and villagers currently enjoy and appreciate. This offers a marvellous habitat for many species of birds. In our garden alone we have counted 24, 10 of which are unusual. They all nest here as well. Seems totally inappropriate to consider building industrial units here which will be noisy with transport coming and going, bright security lights and ruining the spectacular country views we currently enjoy. Plenty of unoccupied business units already nearby

Object

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 11239

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Suffolk Wildlife Trust

Representation:

This section should also include reference to Special Areas of Conservation (SACs), Ramsar sites and County Wildlife Sites (CWSs). SACs and Ramsar sites are of international nature conservation importance and CWSs are of at least county importance, these designations are present in one or both of the districts and so should be recognised in this section.

As well as designated sites, UK Priority habitats (under Section 41 of the Natural Environment and Rural Communities (NERC) Act (2006)) should also be recognised as being considerable assets in the districts. Recognition of these as assets should then be apparent in plan policies.

Full text:

See attachment

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 11814

Received: 09/11/2017

Respondent: Dedham Vale Society

Representation:

The comments made by the Society which follow are confined to aspects of the consultation paper which are considered to have a potential impact on the landscape, appearance, buildings or tranquillity of the Dedham Vale AONB (note incorrectly designated on page 11 under Landscape). We consider it is most important to acknowledge that developments immediately proximate to the AONB can be just as damaging to the area as those actually within the designated boundary and should be subject to the same stringent standards. We would also expect the plan explicitly to reaffirm the Council's support for the proposed extension of the AONB to Bures and north towards Sudbury.

Full text:

See attached full representation.

Support

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 11817

Received: 09/11/2017

Respondent: Dedham Vale Society

Representation:

The Society is entirely happy to support and applaud your objective under the first bullet point under the Environment to protect and enhance environmental assets.

Full text:

See attached full representation.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 12622

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Environment Agency

Representation:

Although we welcome the inclusion of water quality as a key environmental issue, we would expect to see here reference to wastewater infrastructure. Wastewater infrastructure is the most important pressure on environmental water quality. Growth and development - potential to reduce the efficacy of.... infrastructure leading to major problems
There is no mention of the Water Framework Directive (WFD), and the requirements and obligations laid out in the Anglian River Basin Management Plan (RBMP).This links to water quality, but also biodiversity and amenity. Overall we would expect to see the WFD considered to a greater extent throughout the Local Plan.

Full text:

See attached for full rep