Key Social Issues

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Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 437

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: RSPB Stour Estuary and Wolves Wood

Representation:

The RSPB welcomes the Council has identified a deficiency in accessible green space.

We direct the Council to Natural England's Accessible Natural Green Space Standards.

Accessible Natural greenspaces are important for people's physical and mental well being and can help reduce levels of heart disease, obesity and depression.

Full text:

The RSPB welcomes that the Council has identified a deficiency in accessible open space provision. We would like to see measures adopted to ensure that this deficiency is turned around and direct the Council to Natural England's Accesible Natural England Green Space Standards.

Natural greenspaces are very important to our quality of life. They provide a wide range of benefits for people and the environment.

Recent evidence shows that access to natural greenspaces for fresh air, exercise and quiet contemplation has benefits for both physical and mental health. Research provides good evidence of reductions in levels of heart disease, obesity and depression where people live close to greenspaces.

In addition to their potential ecological value, greenspaces also help us adapt to changes in climate through their role in reducing the risk of flooding and by cooling the local environment. Where trees are present they also act as filters for air pollution. Nature nearby is good for people, good for wildlife and good for the environment

Object

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 706

Received: 06/11/2017

Respondent: Martyn Levett

Representation:

1. (a) The population of Babergh was previously projected to increase by 7,500 between 1996 and 2016 (86,100 to 93,600, or just over 375 per annum) (b) your figure for the growing population is projected on the same premise: an increase of 8,000 people. However, this is another erroneous projection replicated from the previous data.
2. If house prices represents 9x average income with 28% of the population income deprived, how do you justify permissions for larger developments with 3, 4 and 5 bedroom houses between £250,000 - £500,000 requiring incomes of £47,000 - £66,000 pa on pro-rata average income

Full text:

1. On the basis of your profile population of 87,740 the projected figures previous projections using your expansion models were (a) The population of Babergh will increase by 7,500 between 1996 and 2016 (86,100 to 93,600, or just over 375 per annum) (b) your figure for the growing population is projected on the same premise: an increase of 8,000 people. However, this is another erroneous projection replicated from the previous data.
2. On your income deprivation figures, if the current house prices represents 9 times the average income with 28% of the population income deprived, how do you justify permissions for larger developments with 3, 4 and 5 bedroom houses priced between £250,000 - £500,000 which requires incomes of £47,000 - £66,000 pa by the same pro-rata average income.

Object

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 732

Received: 06/11/2017

Respondent: Mr. Nick Miller for Sudbury Green Belt Group

Representation:

The plan is deficient in its priorities, and in what is left out. Needs to refer to an overall objective of a 'bottom line' for environmental and social safeguards, and recognition that infill, sprawl and ribbon effect will result from this Plan. Future Green spaces to be saved must be identified and ring-fenced from development, in advance of development plans (hasn't happened with Chilton Woods), so that both are catered for long-term.

Full text:

A GROWING POPULATION: a growth of 8,000 people in Babergh is mentioned, this is obviously massive in the context that the current population of Sudbury & Gt Cornard is 22,000. Comments made to our group include: "This list of building sites fills me with horror and quite frankly depresses me. There is just no end to it". "I work in London so I know why saving this area is important". ""a beautiful place destroyed, just work for someone driving round the county with a tractor in tow (referring to groundwork at a large site proposed for building. Sudbury is nothing now, I'm moving away, a nice place when we came, it will soon be all houses and traffic." If this Plan is not to cause alarm and despondency, then we must call on our district council to make a plan to a gold standard; we believe that would be feasible and affordable, but requires just a small shift in basic parameters for quality of development, some of which we set out in this submission.
An Ageing Demographic: the wording in the box suggests remedies will be seen solely in building health facilities and housing; ignoring or overriding environmental and transport issues. We have fears about this which we ask the plan to directly address: First, that this should not be at the cost of other land-uses. Second, That this should not be done in the modern on-the-cheap way. On the first point, we hear that at least three vital open space areas are being proposed for special housing: a) the Ormiston Academy site which will be demolished after re-building the school on adjacent fields; b) land adjoining the Health Centre, which must not be lost to wildlife in the way three other NHS properties in the town have been, and recognising the heartache caused by destruction of the adjacent 'Prolog' site; and c) the last vacant plot on Cat's Lane. On the second point, we give as an example the removal of warden services from sheltered housing. Overall, we believe the Plan fails in not identifying areas for special housing at the outset; the consequence is that after house-building is complete, extra building 'for the elderly' is an excuse to take extra land; so whenever the 'ageing' excuse is put forward for building, we would expect Babergh's Local Plan to already have identified sites, served by community and public transport etc; and failing that Babergh should have negotiated to have first call on any County Council land that is being disposed of [we note 'specialist accommodation' in this document: 'In Babergh there is a need for 1,125 sheltered units, 106 enhanced sheltered units and 138 extra care units (2014 - 2036)'.]
OPEN SPACE: we need to have a breakdown of what the identified shortfall is, we need Accessible Natural Greenspace to be a priority as advised by Natural England's ANGST strategy, and we must point out Babergh's concentration to date on play equipment, though welcome, makes perhaps the least contribution to open space.
LOW CRIME LEVELS: we need hardly point that the national downward trend in crime has changed in the last year; and there is decreasing employment in Sudbury with the imminent CAV closure; and that the less fulfilling people's environment, the worse will be crime levels and people's willingness to prevent or combat it.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 844

Received: 16/10/2017

Respondent: Mrs Gillian West

Representation:

1. Need to improve educational provision to reduce/avoid pupil commute.
2. BDC should aim to build more housing for elderly to remain independent but have smaller, more manageable homes.
3. Instead of 'community open spaces' BDC/Planning need to stop over-development of residential estates where homes have tiny gardens & no outdoor recreation provision for residents/young people. Not acceptable to off-set elsewhere.
4. Desperately need to prioritise social house construction thru' redevelopment of brownfield sites, including town centres & peripheries, to avoid unnecessary/unacceptable use of greenfield/agricultural land.

Full text:

1. Need to improve educational provision to reduce/avoid pupil commute.
2. BDC should aim to build more housing for elderly to remain independent but have smaller, more manageable homes.
3. Instead of 'community open spaces' BDC/Planning need to stop over-development of residential estates where homes have tiny gardens & no outdoor recreation provision for residents/young people. Not acceptable to off-set elsewhere.
4. Desperately need to prioritise social house construction thru' redevelopment of brownfield sites, including town centres & peripheries, to avoid unnecessary/unacceptable use of greenfield/agricultural land.

Support

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 915

Received: 17/10/2017

Respondent: Mr David Brown

Representation:

Housing needs to suitable for the variety of needs and affordable for first time buyers especially.
It is not difficult to offer a wide range of dwellings to suit most needs.

Full text:

Housing needs to suitable for the variety of needs and affordable for first time buyers especially.
It is not difficult to offer a wide range of dwellings to suit most needs.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 916

Received: 17/10/2017

Respondent: Mr David Brown

Representation:

Overall the Plan expresses some good ideas, but I fear that a lot of opportunities to improve the villages of Elmswell & Woolpit will be lost due to planning conditions being diluted to enhance the profits of the developers. Both villages will require improvement in social, commercial, industrial and medical facilities. Both villages will require significant infrastructure upgrades. Any further development to the north of the railway in Elmswell will make the provision of a relief road over the railway essential.

Full text:

Overall the Plan expresses some good ideas, but I fear that a lot of opportunities to improve the villages of Elmswell & Woolpit will be lost due to planning conditions being diluted to enhance the profits of the developers. Both villages will require improvement in social, commercial, industrial and medical facilities. Both villages will require significant infrastructure upgrades. Any further development to the north of the railway in Elmswell will make the provision of a relief road over the railway essential.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 1351

Received: 22/10/2017

Respondent: Ms Carole Skippen

Representation:

The aim should be to build more housing for the elderly to remain independent in their own homes this means having smaller & more manageable homes.
Before taking away our beautiful countryside surely it would be better to redevelop brownfield sites & town centres.
Countryside & rural area's already have a shortfall of schools which would mean children would have to travel miles to already over subscribed town schools.

Full text:

The aim should be to build more housing for the elderly to remain independent in their own homes this means having smaller & more manageable homes.
Before taking away our beautiful countryside surely it would be better to redevelop brownfield sites & town centres.
Countryside & rural area's already have a shortfall of schools which would mean children would have to travel miles to already over subscribed town schools.

Object

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 3361

Received: 07/11/2017

Respondent: Mr John Bellwood

Representation:

Population growth takes no account of the consequences of Brexit and is likely to be over-estimated.

The starting point for housing must derive from an accurate forecast of population growth, the plan must go back to this starting point and forward forward.

Full text:

Population growth takes no account of the consequences of Brexit and is likely to be over-estimated.

The starting point for housing must derive from an accurate forecast of population growth, the plan must go back to this starting point and forward forward.

Object

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 4407

Received: 08/11/2017

Respondent: Mr Martin Hayman

Representation:

Has this jargon filled David Brent-eque twaddle even been proof-read?

Delivery? Houses and policies cannot be delivered. Homes can be built or constructed, Policies can have their objectives or targets met. Delivering is the function of postmen and companies such as DHL.

Full of split infinitives and references to 'alternatives' (there can only ever be one alternative), this document is sub GCSE standard.

"Whilst there is extensive countryside previous assessments for Babergh and Mid Suffolk have identified an identified deficiency in accessible open space provision,"
Please rewrite in clear English and have someone intelligent read it before publication

Full text:

Has this jargon filled David Brent-eque twaddle even been proof-read?

Delivery? Houses and policies cannot be delivered. Homes can be built or constructed, Policies can have their objectives or targets met. Delivering is the function of postmen and companies such as DHL.

Full of split infinitives and references to 'alternatives' (there can only ever be one alternative), this document is sub GCSE standard.

"Whilst there is extensive countryside previous assessments for Babergh and Mid Suffolk have identified an identified deficiency in accessible open space provision,"
Please rewrite in clear English and have someone intelligent read it before publication

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 5688

Received: 08/11/2017

Respondent: Ms Helen Davies

Representation:

With a growing elderly population and a significant level of deprivation housing will need to reflect these needs - bungalows and starter homes which people can afford - not the preferred 3/4 bed houses that developers want to build - the right houses in the right places.

Babergh needs to stick to the agreed percentage of affordable housing - 35% and not accept less from developers.

Full text:

With a growing elderly population and a significant level of deprivation housing will need to reflect these needs - bungalows and starter homes which people can afford - not the preferred 3/4 bed houses that developers want to build - the right houses in the right places.

Babergh needs to stick to the agreed percentage of affordable housing - 35% and not accept less from developers.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 6215

Received: 09/11/2017

Respondent: MSDC Green Group

Representation:

Revised text see full submission

Full text:

Revised text see full submission

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 6624

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Mr Peter Powell

Representation:

The key social issues highlight the need to stick to the 35% affordable housing, to promote Starter homes that are more appropriate for the young people in our communities, and promote bungalows that are needed for our ageing population. But the one thing missing from this JLP is any consideration to start building Council properties.
Over the last few decades commercial building has been relatively constant, it was the decline in council building that has had the biggest impact in decline of new homes. Councils building supports local trades and can better provide affordable housing.

Full text:

The key social issues highlight the need to stick to the 35% affordable housing, to promote Starter homes that are more appropriate for the young people in our communities, and promote bungalows that are needed for our ageing population. But the one thing missing from this JLP is any consideration to start building Council properties.
Over the last few decades commercial building has been relatively constant, it was the decline in council building that has had the biggest impact in decline of new homes. Councils building supports local trades and can better provide affordable housing.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 8039

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Roger Brand

Representation:

The question of the ageing demographic is a serious one. Villages like Beyton need some new life. By my estimate we have more dogs than children and more unoccupied bedrooms than occupied. The price of property is not the only reason for this. There seems little to attract young families, who tend to prefer the likes of Moreton Hall in Bury. Unless things change, the village will just become a resting place for the elderly. If that is the intention, better provision for the elderly is required

Full text:

The question of the ageing demographic is a serious one. Villages like Beyton need some new life. By my estimate we have more dogs than children and more unoccupied bedrooms than occupied. The price of property is not the only reason for this. There seems little to attract young families, who tend to prefer the likes of Moreton Hall in Bury. Unless things change, the village will just become a resting place for the elderly. If that is the intention, better provision for the elderly is required

Object

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 8452

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Mr Michael Beiley

Representation:

The 2014 study took no account of the potential impact of Brexit e.g. control of inward migration and housing demand . A more cautious and conservative approach should be adopted until the impacts of Brexit become clearer.

Full text:

The 2014 study took no account of the potential impact of Brexit e.g. control of inward migration and housing demand . A more cautious and conservative approach should be adopted until the impacts of Brexit become clearer.

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 11654

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Haughley Park Consortium

Agent: Boyer Planning

Representation:

Overall, we agree with the Council's Key Social Issues, particularly in respect of the Districts' growing housing need.
We also agree that Mid Suffolk currently holds a low business formation rate and this represents a Key Economic Issue across the Districts.
We also agree with the Councils that there is an employment land needs requirement in Mid Suffolk, which includes Small Business Units (B1b) and Distribution (B8).
We welcome the recognition that Babergh and Mid Suffolk are rich in heritage assets, which represents itself as an "Environmental Issue" to be recognised across the Districts.

Full text:

See attachment

Support

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 11948

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Fieldens Ltd

Agent: Boyer Planning

Representation:

We agree with the Council's Key Social Issues, particularly, their recognition of the Districts' growing population.

Full text:

See attachment

Comment

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 12067

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Lord Andrew Phillips OBE

Representation:

managing the impact on incoming population into towns is a key social/cultural issue. Chilton Woods development will have a population the size of Clare to be placed on the eastern edge of Sudbury.

Full text:

These are my (much abbreviated) observations on the JLP. I want to start, however, by saying that, for all the criticisms below,
I do realise that the vast majority of Councillors are true democrats, work hard and only for the good of their constituents and
area. What is more, everything is now barbarically complex and pressured. I would say broadly the same of
council employees, and speak, as with Councillors, of people at all levels in all three local government tiers.
I sought to obtain a hard copy of the JLP, without success, and was only able to spend this afternoon in Sudbury
Town Hall looking at it - all of 371 pages (plus 20 for the 'Sustainability Appraisal') I was told that a dozen or so had called in to see it,
and at the Library, the other viewing place, a dozen in the first couple of days and about one per day since.
Here are some very brief points of view:
1. As a real consultation it has been a near farce. They did not even produce a much abbreviated summary of it.
2. I have lived in Sudbury over half my life, and was brought up here, and lived nearby and/or with parents here
for most of the other years - I know it intimately, and care for it deeply and am inter alia President of the Sudbury Society
3. The Town was the recipient of vast London overspill in Cornard after the war and have in recent decades received
overspill from the increasingly oppulent villages (such as Lavenham) as a result of a form of nimbyism plus the pricing out
of true locals and the need of Babergh DC to satisfy national targets. This is not to decry the incomers - most have fitted
in well and 'localised', but it is fruitless to pretend that it continues to put huge, usually 'under the counter' pressure on us,
aided and abbetted by the national developers, which mostly don't care tuppence about social/cultural matters, but only
their profits. Unlike the developers of my youth, they don't have to live with what they do. I think this vital, strategic issue
is seriously under-appreciated by the JLP. It is not even mentioned as a 'Key social issue'
4. I couldn't see mention of that issue in the summary section in relation to the Chilton Woods development in particular,
yet it will plonk on the Town's eastern edge new estates containing a population equivalent to that of Clare! How daft is that?
5. Sudbury has, so the JLP says, the 3 poorest areas in BDC (or was it Suffolk.) That goes with having a young population,
which is wonderful for an oldie! But to further undermine the cohesion of the Town by excessive development is wholly
counter-productive.
6 To add to that, the JLP says far too little, and insufficiently forcefully when it does, about the whole feel, ambiance, culture,
attraction of its remarkable mix. Betjeman told me once that he thought it one of the finest market towns in the UK. And
so it is. Gainsborough and Constable , who both painted us and our environs, would have been in arms.
7 Get the traffic out of the town centre - it's a must from every standpoint!

Support

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 12296

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Taylor Wimpey

Agent: Boyer Planning

Representation:

We agree with the Council's Key Social Issues, particularly, their recognition of the Districts' growing population.

Full text:

See attachments

Support

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 12446

Received: 10/11/2017

Respondent: Taylor Wimpey

Agent: Boyer Planning

Representation:

We agree with the Council's Key Social Issues, particularly, their recognition of the District's growing population.

Full text:

See attachments

Support

BMSDC Joint Local Plan Consultation Document (Interactive)

Representation ID: 13149

Received: 09/11/2017

Respondent: Taylor Wimpey

Agent: Boyer Planning

Representation:

We agree with the Council's Key Social Issues, particularly, their recognition of the Districts' growing population.

Full text:

See attached